Are You Closing the Legislative Advocacy Loop?

Are You Closing the Legislative Advocacy Loop?
Part of planning the strategy for the new year is looking back at the past year. What worked well and got the most engagement from the campaigns that you ran? Which bills were important to members? What bills passed or didn't? How did your legislators vote on those bills? It's not uncommon to forget about these questions as we rush into the new ...

Part of planning the strategy for the new year is looking back at the past year. What worked well and got the most engagement from the campaigns that you ran? Which bills were important to members? What bills passed or didn't? How did your legislators vote on those bills?

It's not uncommon to forget about these questions as we rush into the new year. But pausing long enough to let your data guide your decisions about what to focus on the new year and legislative sessions is not only a time and resource saver later on, it is also what will ensure that you stay relevant with your members. Communicating the value of their engagement and tying it to results will encourage them to engage again in the future. The more engaged a member is, the more likely they are to renew.

One of the greatest shortcoming and opportunities for non profits, chambers of commerce, and professional associations is the telling of their story through the results that they have helped their members achieve. Sometimes the hardest story to tell is our own. But there are steps you can take to start communicating results long before the campaign ends.

Steps to Communicating Your Advocacy Campaigns Results 

  1. Start early and often. Don't just tell people what happened when it is over, share regular updates with them as the campaign progresses. Give results as they happen. Update your advocacy landing page letting people know how many others like them have already emailed or called legislators about an issue. Create engagements reports that you can share directly with legislators letting them know how your members feel about an issue before it comes to a debate or vote.
  2. Track the legislation that your members say is most important to them now. It is easy to assume we know what is important to people. By asking them to vote internally and comment in your private communities, you can determine which bills you should be paying the most attention to and rating it accordingly.
  3. Create score cards for legislators. Which legislators are working for your member's interests. and which are not? Communicate this on your advocacy landing pages for specific legislation by embedding it, or on your website as a general summary, or in your private and public member communities.
  4. Share, share, and share again. On social media, in your email campaigns and newsletters. Hopefully you have segmented your members and asked them how they prefer their communications and how often. Tell them what happened (so far), how it happened (with their emails and sharing), why it is important (how will this impact their lives?), and what to expect next.
Source: www.votility.com