For Car Dealerships, the Motorola CP200d is More Than Standard Equipment

Car dealerships cover a lot of ground. New and used cars and trucks along with service bays and the showrooms can sprawl over dozens of acres. It’s not like co-workers are within shouting distance. That’s why two-way radios are such a popular choice for car dealerships. Dealers know exactly how much coverage they need, and they can choose radios ...

Car dealerships cover a lot of ground. New and used cars and trucks along with service bays and the showrooms can sprawl over dozens of acres. It’s not like co-workers are within shouting distance.

That’s why two-way radios are such a popular choice for car dealerships. Dealers know exactly how much coverage they need, and they can choose radios designed specifically for their needs. Phones are fine for contacting somebody at a desk, but people working under the hood or parking a new trade-in are not apt to have a phone nearby.

For years, the CP200 from Motorola has been a favorite of business owners who need a sturdy analog radio that works well across a broad range of disciplines. Car dealers have sales people, parts desk people, technicians, security guards and maintenance staff. Each one has specialized skills but they share a common need: being able to easily push one button and talk to co-workers on the other side of the lot.

In 2013, Motorola introduced the CP200d, a digital version of the popular CP200. Why would car dealers need a digital version of their old standby? A few points spring to mind:

  • Digital radios have better sound quality to the edge of their range — conversations don’t fill up with more static as people move farther way from each other.
  • Digital radios are optimized for voice communications and can tune out background noise, which can be a big bonus for front office managers talking to service technicians in the shop amid revving engines and air wrenches running full blast.
  • A digital radio can communicate on a dealership’s local area network, enabling a technician to confer with engineers at the factory, even if it’s on the other side of the world.
  • The CP200d uses about 40 percent less power than the analog model, so it lasts longer on a charge and stands a better chance of remaining powered up for an entire shift.

The MOTOTRBO advantage

The CP200d joins Motorola Solutions’ MOTOTRBO line of digital communications gear. MOTOTRBO is about much more than radios — the product line includes hardware and software that can enable a sophisticated network of digital devices connected via wireless and wired networks.

Because the CP200d transmits packets of data for delivery over IP (Internet Protocol) networks, it is a computing device generating data that can be analyzed to improve productivity and profitability. That, in turn, allows dealers a chance to recoup the cost of their radios — they’re not just one more cost of doing business and providing customer service. The CP200d also can be programmed to perform basic digital functions like opening gates or turning on security lights.

CP200d features

The CP200d can work in analog or digital mode, ensuring your digital models can communicate with older analogs. It can be purchased in analog mode and converted to digital capability with a simple software upgrade.

It also has 1 to 5 watts of power in VHF and 1 to 4 watts in UHF, which is plenty of power for a well-defined area like a car dealership. The 16-channel capacity allows dealers to assign specific channels to individual departments, so sales people aren’t interrupted by service people and so on.

Operation is kept simple, ensuring that it’s easy to train your staff: A push-to-talk button on the side accompanies a programmable button. A rotating button on top selects channels. Also, all chargers and accessories for the CP200 work for the CP200d.

If you’re already using Motorola radios in your car dealership, ask a BearCom rep about upgrading to digital. You don’t have to do it all at once, and you can add just a few radios to see how you like them before committing.

Source: blog.bearcom.com