LIFE ABOVE THE FOLD - WHY IT'S NO LONGER RELEVANT

LIFE ABOVE THE FOLD - WHY IT'S NO LONGER RELEVANT
Anytime we begin our UX and design process, our clients are concerned about the dreaded “fold.” You know the part of your site that users see when they come to your site? The part that shows before you scroll? That area is considered “above the fold”—and it used to be a major concern when thinking about usability and accessing content. After all, ...

Anytime we begin our UX and design process, our clients are concerned about the dreaded “fold.” You know the part of your site that users see when they come to your site? The part that shows before you scroll? That area is considered “above the fold”—and it used to be a major concern when thinking about usability and accessing content. After all, we wouldn’t want our users to miss out on valuable content because they fail to scroll down, right? 

Guess what? Users scroll.

It’s true. 

Let’s break this down. The concern about having your most important content above the fold came out of a study that told us 80% of users spend their time above the fold, while only 20% scroll to view content below the fold. That’s a compelling argument to keep your top content above the fold, for sure. But instead of letting one result of one study be the gospel of web design, the folks at Huge decided to test this theory. What’s more, they decided to test it recently with several more years of personal web experience and familiarity with how websites function not only on desktop computers, but on a variety of devices.
The study at Huge took a look at how design impacts a user’s likeliness to scroll. That is, do design elements cue users to interact with a page in different ways? The answer is, roughly speaking, not really. Regardless of the page layout presented, over 90% of users scrolled in every scenario.

Think of how you use a phone or a tablet. Isn’t it satisfying to simply swipe your finger on the screen and see more content? Not only do people scroll, but they also expect to scroll. It’s become second nature to the user experience. 

Who knows why users weren’t scrolling 5 years ago, but now? Users are most definitely scrolling. 

Source: www.balanceinteractive.com